Harvest Thermal’s Smart Battery HVAC Wins Major Efficiency Award at CEE 23

–News Direct–

Alice Rosenberg of the Consortium of Energy Efficiency awards Dr. Jane Melia and Pierre Delforge of Harvest Thermal the Integrated Home Competition Award
Alice Rosenberg of the Consortium of Energy Efficiency awards Dr. Jane Melia and Pierre Delforge of Harvest Thermal the Integrated Home Competition Award

Bay Area climate tech startup Harvest Thermal has achieved another level of recognition in the energy efficiency ecosystem. Its smart thermal battery won the Consortium of Energy Efficiencys Integrated Home Competition award, putting it closer to top-of-mind for installers, homebuilders, and homeowners looking to dramatically reduce emissions from homes.

The Integrated Home Competition recognizes newly available products that will work to achieve CEEs vision of a comfortable, convenient, connected home. It promotes devices and systems that meet consumer expectations in terms of interoperability, reliability, and simplicity of use with an emphasis on delivering energy performance and demand savings.

Its a proud moment for the team at Harvest Thermal to take the top prize in what is essentially Center Court of the energy efficiency world, said CEO Jane Melia. Its quite an honor to earn the recognition of utility experts who must ensure the delivery of reliable, cost-effective electricity that is safe for a livable planet.

By decarbonizing home heating and hot water, Americans can slash 10% of national emissions and of their lifestyle emissions. Harvests integrated home heating and hot water solution cuts emissions by 90% compared to gas equipment and lowers bills by 30% on average. Harvest is proud to be recognized as a leading solutions provider for anyone who owns and heats their home or water.

ABOUT HARVEST THERMAL

Harvest Thermal is redesigning home heating and hot water for the planet. Its market-leading thermal battery system cuts carbon emissions by 90% from home heating and hot water compared to gas and 50% compared to heat pumps without storage. The cloud-connected Harvest Pod leverages software, sensors, and controls to reduce carbon emissions, and save an average of 30% off monthly heating bills. It also supports a cleaner, cheaper, and more resilient grid. Founded in 2019, Harvest Thermal has received support from the National Science Foundation, the California Energy Commission, Peninsula Clean Energy, and private investors.

RECENT AWARDS

NREL Industry Growth Forums 2023 Peoples Choice Award,

Edison Award for Sustainable Design, Consumer Solutions

Fast Companys Most Innovative Companies List for 2023.

CEO Jane Melia was named Entrepreneur Magazines 100 Women of Influence 2022

ABOUT THE CONSORTIUM OF ENERGY EFFICIENCY

The CEE Integrated Home is a connected, fuel-neutral, interactive, and efficient home where devices and systems effectively communicate to provide new value to customers, utility systems, and society. The Integrated Home Competition supports this vision through public promotion of commercially available solutions that are simple, reliable, well-designed, and highly functional. It provides a platform for distinguishing innovation in service to Integrated Demand-side Management objectives, including traditional energy savings.

The Competition is organized by the Air-Conditioning, Heating, and Refrigeration Institute (AHRI), the American Lighting Association (ALA), the Consortium for Energy Efficiency (CEE), and UL Solutions; it is sponsored by over thirty energy efficiency utilities, trade associations, and research entities across the United States and Canada.

Contact Details

Harvest Thermal

David Tuft

+1 202-494-0813

david@harvest-thermal.com

Company Website

https://www.harvest-thermal.com/

View source version on newsdirect.com: https://newsdirect.com/news/harvest-thermals-smart-battery-hvac-wins-major-efficiency-award-at-cee-23-740962904

Harvest Thermal

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